Giovanni Rapacciuolo

Department of Ecology and Evolution email giorapac@gmail.com
Stony Brook University phone +1 (510) 610-5646
Stony Brook skype giovanni.rapacciuolo
New York, 11794-5245, USA www giorapacciuolo.com

EDUCATION

2009 - 2013

PhD, Biodiversity and Global Change. Imperial College London, UK

Thesis title: “Predicting species’ range shifts under global change: when can species distribution models be useful?”

Advisors: Prof Andy Purvis (Department of Life Sciences), Dr David Roy (Biological Records Centre, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology)

2005 - 2009

MSci (undergraduate degree), Biology, 1st class honors. Imperial College London, UK

Thesis title: “Traits correlates of range change in British plants”

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2015 - present

Postdoctoral Fellow. joint position between NatureServe, VA, USA and Stony Brook University, NY, USA

Project: National Science Foundation Dimensions of Biodiversity Grant

Advisors: Dr Bruce Young (NatureServe), Prof Catherine Graham (Department of Ecology & Evolution, Stony Brook University)

2013 - 2015

Postdoctoral Researcher. University of California Berkeley, CA, USA

Project: Berkeley Global Change Biology

Advisors: Prof Rosemary Gillespie, Prof Charles Marshall

GRANTS

2015

Socio-environmental Immersion Fellowship. National Socio-environmental Synthesis Center, MY, USA.

2015

Postdoctoral Fellowship. NatureServe, VA, USA.

2013

Postdoctoral Fellowship. Berkeley Global Change Biology, CA, USA.

2009

Climate Change Research Scholarship. Old Mutual plc, London, UK.

2009

PhD Studentship. Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK.

PUBLICATIONS

Google Scholar profile | Altmetrics data

Submitted

Rapacciuolo G, Marin J, Costa GC, Helmus MR, Behm JE, Brooks TM, Hedges SB, Radeloff VC, Young BE, Graham CH. A detectable signal of human pressure amid ecological constraints on the biogeography of body mass in tetrapods. Global Ecology and Biogeography

Marin J, Rapacciuolo G, Costa GC, Graham CH, Brooks TM, Young BE, Radeloff VC, Behm JE, Helmus MR, Hedges SB. Evolutionary time, rather than ecology and climatic stability, is the primary driver of global tetrapod diversity. Ecology Letters

Ball-Damerow JE*, Rapacciuolo G*, Resh VH. Detecting long-term change from California Odonata records over a century. Biodiversity and Conservation. * Joint first authors

Zeilinger A, Rapacciuolo G, Turek D, Oboyski P, Almeida R, Roderick G. Museum specimen data reveal emergence of a plant disease may be linked to increases in the insect vector population. Ecological Applications

2016

Fiorella KJ, Rapacciuolo G, Trisos C. (2016) Species loss: learn from health metrics. Nature (Correspondence) 538: 371 Find full text

Kelly M, Easterday K, Rapacciuolo G, Koo MS, McIntyre P, Thorne J. (2016) Rescuing and sharing historical vegetation data for ecological analysis: The California Vegetation Type Mapping project. Biodiversity Data Journal 11: 40 - 62 Find full text

2015

Pearse WD, Chase MW, Crawley MJ, Dolphin K, Fay MF, Joseph JA, Powney G, Preston CD, Rapacciuolo G, Roy DB, and Purvis A (2015) Beyond the EDGE with EDAM: Prioritising British Plant Species According to Evolutionary Distinctiveness, and Accuracy and Magnitude of Decline. PLoS One 10: e0126524. Find full text

2014

Rapacciuolo G, Maher S, Schneider AC, Hammond TT, Jabis MD, Walsh WE, Iknayan KJ, Walden GK, Oldfather MF, Ackerly DD, Beissinger SR (2014) Beyond a warming fingerprint: individualistic biogeographic responses to heterogeneous climate change in California. Global Change Biology 20: 2841 - 2855. Find full text.

Rapacciuolo G, Roy DB, Gillings S, Purvis A (2014). Temporal validation plots: quantifying how well species distribution models predict species’ range changes over time. Methods in Ecology and Evolution 5: 407 - 420. Find full text.

Powney GD, Rapacciuolo G, Preston CD, Purvis A, Roy DB (2014) A phylogenetically-informed trait-based analysis of range change in the vascular plant flora of Britain. Biodiversity and Conservation 23: 171 - 185. Find full text.

2012

Rapacciuolo G, Roy DB, Gillings S, Fox R, Walker K, Purvis A (2012) Climatic associations of British species distributions show good transferability in time but low predictive accuracy for range change. PLoS One 7: e40212. Find full text.

Oliver TH, Gillings S, Girardello M, Rapacciuolo G, Brereton TM, Siriwardena GM, Roy DB, Pywell R, Fuller RJ (2012) Population density but not stability can be predicted from species distribution models. Journal of Applied Ecology 49: 581 - 590. Find full text.

AWARDS

2011

Best talk. Postgraduate Student Symposium, Imperial College London, UK.

2009

Top grade. MSci Biology cohort, Imperial College London, UK.

2009

Imperial College candidate (with 2 others) for UK Biology Student of the Year Award. Science, Engineering & Technology Student of the Year Awards, UK.

INVITED TALKS

24 Jan 2017

University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Title: “Improving climate change vulnerability assessments using data on functional traits and historical distributions”.

24 Apr 2014

Australian National University, Canberra, AU.

Title: “Using historic data sources to calibrate and validate models of species’ range dynamics”.

21 Sep 2012

Botanical Society of the British Isles, Edinburgh, UK.

Title: “Can we predict recently-observed changes in the British Flora?”.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

Talks

6 Sep 2011

“Species distribution models fail to predict observed range shifts of British species from climate”. Birmingham University, Birmingham, UK.

Posters

11 Jan 2017

“A signature of human pressure amid ecological constraints on the distribution of body mass in tetrapods”. International Biogeography Meeting 2017, Tucson, AZ, USA.

23 Apr 2014

“Holos: Rescuing and integrating data in the face of global change”. Australian National University, Canberra, AU.

DEPARTMENTAL TALKS (in the last 4 years)

Mar 2016

“Drivers of ecological niche volume and packing in terrestrial vertebrate assemblages across the globe”. NatureServe, VA, USA.

Nov 2015

“Using disparate historical data sources to understand species’ recent and likely future range shifts”. Stony Brook University, NY, USA.

Mar 2015

“Detection and attribution of species’ recent range shifts using disparate historic data sources”. University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Oct 2014

“Extracting signals of change from noisy biocollection data”. University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Mar 2014

“Integrating past, present, and future biological and environmental data for innovative global change biology research”. University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Mar 2013

“Temporal validation plots: a new tool for assessing how well species distribution models predict species’ range dynamics over time”. University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Feb 2013

“Can species distribution models predict recently-observed changes in the distributions of birds, butterflies and vascular plants of Great Britain?”. University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.

TECHNICAL SKILLS

Ecological modeling

Expertise in calibration and validation of models of the distribution and abundance of species and communities across space and time using linear, machine-learning, and hierarchical Bayesian methods.

Expertise in geospatial analyses and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Expertise in trait-based models and phylogenetic comparative analyses.

Programming

Expertise in R programming and statistical environment for integration, manipulation and analysis of big data.

Working knowledge of JAGS, WinBUGS, Python, Markdown, HTML.

Languages

Trilingual: English, French (native), Italian (native).

TEACHING

Thesis supervisor

2013

Arif Ali. BS, Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Thesis title: “The effect of the changing water balance on California forests”.

2011

Emma Sheard. MSc, Ecology, Evolution and Conservation, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Thesis title: “Can biotic interactions be used to explain the distribution of monophagous moths in Britain?”.

Co-instructor

2013

Species Distribution Modeling workshop. University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.

2010, 2011

Generalised Linear Modeling course. Imperial College London.

Teaching assistant

2011, 2012

Computing and Biodiversity modules. MSc, Ecology, Evolution and Conservation, Imperial College London, London, UK.

2010, 2011

Statistics and Computing modules. years 1 - 3, BSc, Biology, Imperial College London, London, UK.

ACADEMIC SERVICE

Reviewer

Grants

Reviewed for National Science Foundation.

Publications

Reviewed for Animal Conservation, Climatic Change, Ecography, Ecology and Evolution, Global Change Biology, Global Ecology and Biogeography, Journal of Biogeography, Methods in Ecology and Evolution, PLoS One. Find Publons profile.

Software

“Silicon Valley 2.0”. Climate change adaptation (ecosystems) assessment. Santa Clara Office of Sustainability, San Francisco, CA, USA. Sep 2014.

“HYKL”. Bayesian species distribution modeling. Microsoft Research, Cambridge, UK. Jun 2012.

Co-organizer

Workshops

“Big ecological questions: diverse data, new methods”. University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA. 31 Oct - 2 Nov 2014.

“Biotic responses to 20th century climate change in California”. University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA. Apr - Dec 2013.

Seminars

Student Seminars. Grantham Institute for Climate Change, Imperial College London, London, UK. Throughout 2011.

Developer

Software

Generated R source code for method of temporal validation plots.

Helped with conceptualization and scientific direction of https://holos.berkeley.edu/

Websites

Personal research website: http://giorapacciuolo.com.

Purvis lab website. Imperial College London, London, UK. From 2010 - 2012.

REFERENCES

Current Postdoc

Prof Catherine Graham, catherine.graham@wsl.ch.

Department of Ecology & Evolution, Stony Brook University, NY, USA

Berkeley Postdoc

Prof Rosemary Gillespie, gillespie@berkeley.edu.

Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California Berkeley, CA, USA.

PhD

Prof Andy Purvis, andy.purvis@nhm.ac.uk.

Department of Life Sciences, Natural History Museum, London, UK.